SUBMERSIBLE CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

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Submersible Centrifugal Pump Overview

The submersible centrifugal pumps are machines to lift fluids from a lower level to a certain height. It allows liquid to transfer from low-pressure areas to high-pressure areas. Its primary purpose is to turn electrical power into mechanical energy to transfer liquid across a height.

Submersible pumps are a type of centrifugal pumps underneath water entirely. These pumps are closed off hermetically for maximum liquid displacement and propagation.

What’s more, these pumps are best for immersion because of their versatile design options and high performance. The motors in the submersible centrifugal pumps have compartments filled with oil and do not connect with the fluid they push.

Submersible Centrifugal Pump Brands

Ideal Barnes Applications:

  • Industrial heat transfer
  • Solids handling
  • Waste
  • Sump
  • Dewatering
  • Mixing

Ideal Grundfos Applications:

  • Condensate
  • Pressure boost
  • HVAC
  • Irrigation
  • Industrial heat transfer
  • Solids handling
  • Waste
  • Sump
  • Dewatering
  • Filtration
  • Mixing
  • Descaling
Gusher Pumps Logo

Ideal Gusher Pumps Applications:

  • HVAC
  • Industrial heat transfer
  • Waste
  • Sump
  • Mixing
  • Machine cooling

Submersible Centrifugal Pump: Working Principle

The pump mainly pushes the water underground to the higher levels for fluid propagation. Unlike most pumps, the submersible pump pushes water instead of pulling it.

These pumps work best for pumping water from wells to higher surfaces by changing the rotary speed and kinetic energy. The diffuser blades on the pump convert the remaining kinetic energy into pressure energy.

People prefer these pumps mainly because they help prevent cavitations, i.e., creating empty spaces full of air, which impacts the pumping process. You can also use these pumps to dump water out of a tank or transfer it between two different points.

Other people may also use these pumps for heavy oil or water transfer processes. These pumps do not require priming because they can submerge into the water entirely and do not have a dry surrounding.

These pumps have a high chance of developing performance issues and need to be taken out of the water for maintenance. 

The water in these pumps strikes the impeller, creating pressure for liquid propagation. The impeller connects with an electrical motor via a shaft, making it rotate for pressure generation.

 Thus, the water’s kinetic energy converts into a higher liquid speed, and the liquid moves from the impeller to the diffuser. The diffuser converts the flowing water into pressure energy and increases the water pressure. The pressurized water charges the outlet and the outer pump valve, transferring water between the two desired points.

Factors to Consider while choosing a Submersible Centrifugal Pump

Following are the most important things to consider when choosing a submersible centrifugal pump.

Type of Water

The kind of liquid you want to transfer significantly impacts the machine’s performance. Several pumps operate well in clean water, whereas others are best suited for dirty water. Similarly, people who process oils need a different kind of submersible pump. Remember you need a pump that supports optimal performance for at least 10m to 20m depth.

Discharge Height

The height for the liquid required also has a massive impact on the pump’s performance. The submersible’s pumping power determines if the water will reach the required height or not. Thus, always buy a pump with suitable power level.

Bottom Line

Investing in a high quality submersible pump allows users to pull water from underground sources and help it reach designated heights. Buyers should consider the kind of water they deal with and the height they need the liquid on before making the final purchase. You can always consult with a professional to ensure you choose the right submersible centrifugal pump.

Check out this video on Submersible Pumps!

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